Q3 browser stats

It’s time for the quarterly browser stats according to StatCounter. Also, I present a comparison between StatCounter’s numbers and Akamai’s.

Mobile

On the mobile side something interesting happened: both Safari and Android WebKit lost ground this quarter. They did so too in Q2, but then they lost only 2% combined, and it could be seen as a minor fluctuation. In Q3 their combined loss was 5%.

Although it may still be a random fluctuation, we also see the outlines of a theory where the incumbent mobile browsers gradually lose way to newcomers — newcomers, moreover, that run on cheaper phones. UC generally runs on those, and the Other browsers may, too.

But let’s wait one or two quarters before drawing such conclusions.

The increase in Chrome market share is mostly due to Samsung, which has switched to Chrome from the Galaxy S4 on. Note that this is Chrome 18, and I’m not sure it will be updated regularly. So don’t assume that the 4% quoted below uses the latest Chrome. In fact, most of that 4% probably won’t.

Global mobile browser stats, quarterly
Browser Q3 2013 ch Q2 2013 ch Q1 2013 ch Q4 2012
Android 28% -2 30% -1 31% +4 27%
Safari 23% -3 26% -1 27% +4 23%
Opera 16% 0 16% +1 15% -3 18%
UC 11% +2 9% 0 9% 0 9%
Nokia 7% 0 7% 0 7% -3 10%
Chrome 4% +1 3% +2 1% 0 1%
BlackBerry 3% 0 3% 0 3% -1 4%
NetFront 2% 0 2% -1 3% -1 4%
IE 1% 0 1% 0 1% 0 1%
Other 5% +2 3% 0 3% 0 3%
Volatility 5% 3% 8%
Mobile 18% +3 15% +1 14% +1 13%

Desktop

On the desktop we see the well-known pattern of Chrome winning market share from IE and Firefox, though its growth seems to decline.

Global desktop and tablet browser stats, quarterly
Browser Q3 2013 ch Q2 2013 ch Q1 2013 ch Q4 2012
Chrome 42% +1 41% +4 37% +1 36%
IE 26% -2 28% -2 30% -1 31%
Firefox 19% -1 20% -1 21% -1 22%
Safari 9% +1 8% -1 9% +1 8%
Opera 1% 0 1% 0 1% 0 1%
Others 3% +1 2% 0 2% 0 2%
Volatility 3% 4% 2%

Comparison between StatCounter and Akamai

From now on I’ll also give a comparison between StatCounter’s data and Akamai’s. They come to different conclusions. Bear in mind that in general Akamai is somewhat more US-centric than StatCounter.

The StatCounter data are calculated from the previous two tables. They’re compared to the Akamai data about all browsers. (Akamai doesn’t give separate calculations for mobile and desktop.)

No conclusions; the data is too new for me, and you can see the discrepancies for yourself. I’m not sure it makes sense to take the average, but let’s do it anyway.

Global browser stats, Q3
Browser StatCounter Akamai Average
Chrome desktop 33% 26% 29.5%
IE desktop 20% 29% 24.5%
Firefox desktop 15% 15% 15%
Safari mobile 7% 11% 9%
Android WebKit 5% 8% 6.5%
Safari desktop 4% 6% 5%
Opera Mini 3% 1% 2%
UC 2% - 1%
Chrome mobile 1% 1% 1%
Opera desktop 1% 1% 1%
DoCoMo - 1% 0.5%
BlackBerry 1% - 0.5%
Others 8% 1% 4.5%

This is the blog of Peter-Paul Koch, mobile platform strategist, consultant, and trainer. You can also follow him on Twitter.
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