QuirksBlog

Below you find the last seven QuirksBlog entries.

Scrolling your website past the iPhone X’s notch

Permalink | in Safari

During the introduction of the iPhone X a hilarious gif made the Twitter rounds, showing a list scrolling past the new notch.

I asked the question any web developer would ask: “Hey, is this even possible with web technology?” Turns out it is.

(We should probably ask: “Hey, is this a useful effect, even if it’s possible?” But that’s a boring question, the answer being Probably Not.)

So for laughs I wrote a proof of concept (you need to load that into the iPhone X simulator). Turns out that this little exercise is quite useful for wrapping your head around the visual viewport and zooming. Also, the script turned out to be quite simple.

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safe-area-inset values on iOS11

Permalink | in Safari

With the iPhone X’s notch came viewport-fit=cover and safe-area-inset, as explained here. It turns out that safe-area-inset is 0 on iOS11 devices that are not the iPhone X. This may sound logical, but I wonder if it is. Also, the value remains static, even when you zoom in.

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Chrome breaks visual viewport — again

Permalink | in Viewports

A few weeks back the most exciting viewport news of the past few years broke: Chrome 61 supports a new visual viewport API. Although this new API is an excellent idea, and even includes a zoom event in disguise, the Chrome team decided that its existence warrants breaking old and trusty properties.

I disagree with that course of action, particularly because a better course is readily available: create a new layout viewport API similar to the visual one. Details below.

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The gig economy as student jobs

Permalink | in Web thinking

For years, whenever I thought about the gig economy, I noted to myself that gigs are great for students, who like to be flexible with their time and don't need a lot of money, but not so great for others.

This is not a particularly original thought, so I didn’t pursue it any futher. That’s why it took me until last Sunday to realise that gig jobs being the same as student jobs is not at all a coincidence.

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Looking for new clients

Permalink | in Personal

From September on I am looking for new clients. In fact, I am looking so hard that I updated my About page, something I haven’t done for years.

I’d love to get a job around setting up or troubleshooting an in-house front-end team, or representing unknown browsers to unsuspecting front-enders. I always like fundamental browser research jobs as well, but they’re relatively hard to get since there is limited global interest in that service. Or I can give a new “how to deal with browsers” workshop I’m developing — or even make a website under certain circumstances which boil down to “no frameworks or libraries.”

I have no clue if this is going to help, and I would really hate to be forced into a full-time job, since I’ve become too used to freelancing. But we’ll see.

Anyway, spreading the word would be greatly appreciated.

The elephant in the diversity room

Permalink | in Web thinking

Although there’s a lot of heated discussion around diversity, I feel many of us ignore the elephant in the web development diversity room. We tend to forget about users of older or non-standard devices and browsers, instead focusing on people with modern browsers, which nowadays means the latest versions of Chrome and Safari.

This is nothing new — see “works only in IE” ten years ago, or “works only in Chrome” right now — but as long as we’re addressing other diversity issues in web development we should address this one as well.

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Toolbars, keyboards, and the viewports

Permalink | in Viewports

All mobile browsers have two viewports. The layout viewport constrains your CSS — width: 100% means 100% of the layout viewport — while the visual viewport describes the area of the page the user is currently seeing. This visualisation of the two viewports might be useful as a reminder.

Today’s article studies what happens when these viewports change size. It also studies the resize event.

Some viewport changes are welcomed, such as the visual viewport resize after an orientation change or a zoom action. Others are esoteric, such as rewriting the meta viewport tag. Still others are seen as an annoyance, notably the appearance and disappearance of browser toolbars and the software keyboard.

(This article was originally published on Samsung Internet’s Medium channel. Since I do not believe Medium will survive in the long run I re-publish it here.)

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Even older entries

See the June 2017 archive and beyond.

This is the blog of Peter-Paul Koch, web developer, consultant, and trainer. You can also follow him on Twitter.
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