Below you find the last seven QuirksBlog entries.

Going Samsung

Permalink | in External publications, Samsung

Just now Smashing Magazine published Introducing Samsung Internet, an article I wrote about Samsung’s Chromium 44-based default browser with the fairly unimaginative name. It also contains an interview with Samsung Internet engineer and W3C luminary Jungkee Song about the browser and the ideas behind it.

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Down with the tool fetish

Permalink | in Web thinking

Sometimes I read a paragraph that makes me wish I had written it. Last Monday that happened again: I became profoundly jealous when I read this:

We know libraries, in fact, we have the best libraries. Our libraries are huuuge

It’s the best part of a hilarious dialogue (that I also wish I’d written) between a newbie web developer who needs a simple REST/Ajax site and an “experienced” front-end engineer who patiently explains the insane amount of tooling this requires nowadays. Read it for yourself. It’s worth it. I’ll wait.

The dialogue pokes fun at what passes for modern web development; especially our infatuation with tools, and it succeeds admirably. The purpose of my post is not to react to the article itself, but to two other reactions I read.

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Geek Mental Help Week

Permalink | in Personal

Since it’s Geek Mental Help Week I thought I’d share the most serious mental breakdown I went through in my professional career. When I compare it to the other stories I don’t feel it’s particularly serious — but maybe that sheer common-ness is the reason I’d like to talk about it. Mental health problems are not necessarily about profound traumas and serious disorders; they can also sneak up on people who’re otherwise decently balanced. Also, my story has a happy ending.

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Web development as a hack of hacks

Permalink | in Web thinking

Via Bruce I stumbled upon this interesting Hacker News discussion under the ominous title “Is web programming a series of hacks on hacks?” Thingy’s law applies, so the answer is No, but it’s a qualified No, and we need to understand what we should do in order to avoid a future Yes.

Rather to my surprise the discussion was civilised and made good points. I decided to quote it extensively and jot down some of my thoughts as an old-time web developer who is a declared opponent of the framework craze.

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Q2 Android WebView statistics

Permalink | in Market share

Once more Scientia Mobile sent me their Android WebView stats over the first quarter. I edited them slightly and put them online.

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The limits of @supports

Permalink | in Content

Yesterday I talked about background-attachment and its confusing mobile compatibility patterns. Today I’ll talk about the ulterior motive I had for this retest: Conditional Rules support, which basically amounts to @supports.

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The background-attachment saga

Permalink | in Content

Recently I spent WAY too much time on background-attachment. Even though it’s not a tremendously important CSS declaration, I don’t see any reason not to inflict my pain on you as well. Besides, I retested the CSS Backgrounds and Borders module in all browsers, and that should count for something.

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Even older entries

See the July 2016 archive and beyond.

This is the blog of Peter-Paul Koch, mobile platform strategist, consultant, and trainer. You can also follow him on Twitter.
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